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Microsoft is Finally Making Windows 11 Search Better

This week’s Windows 11 Insider Preview Build 22572 brings plenty of quality of life fixes to the Dev Channel, all of which are detailed on the official Windows blog.

These upcoming features were spotted by Windows Central and the most prominent is Microsoft Family and Clipchamp both becoming inbox apps, meaning they’ll be pre-loaded on Windows 11 machines moving forward. The former allows users to set a wide variety of parental controls, as well as digital activity reporting and parental controls. The latter is a video editing program that’s been streamlined for more intuitive use.

Also in the new update is a much-needed improvement to Windows 11 search. A new feature called ‘search highlights’ will be rolling out to the Insider’s program. It’ll be located in the taskbar and will allow you to see “what’s trending online, in the world, and in your organization”. Maybe this will justify Microsoft requiring everyone to be online when they install Windows 11.

The update won’t be available to all Insiders at first, but should roll out soon – Microsoft is just waiting for user feedback before launching a wider distribution. There will be other changes to features such as Print Queue, Quick Assist, and plenty of other bug fixes and QOL improvements.

It’s not clear when these updates will be making their way to users that aren’t in the Microsoft Insider program, but it’ll likely be in the next major seasonal Windows 11 update, 22H2, which is shaping up to be an important one.

Find high-quality replacement Laptop Battery for sale at Batteriestar.com. Here you can find a great Laptop Battery at discount Laptop Battery prices.

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MacBook Air 2022 was Missing in Action at Apple’s Event, but Leaker Promises it’s Not Dead

We didn’t see a MacBook 2022 turn up at the big Apple Event that just happened, to our surprise, but those keen to see a new laptop from Apple shouldn’t despair – the rumor mill is still sending strong signals that the redesigned MacBook Air remains incoming for 2022.

The latest from reliable Apple leaker Ming-Chi Kuo is that we can expect the MacBook Air revamp to enter mass production late in Q2 or in Q3, so at any point from June through to September. The launch would presumably come shortly thereafter.

The MacBook Air will sport a completely new design, as the rumor mill has contended for a while now, and an “all-new form factor” with “more color options” to be had. Again, the latter assertion about colors has been floating around for some time, with the expectation that the Air will adopt an iMac-like color palette of options.

Analysis: Going with the M1 – really? But what kind of M1?
Of course, design aside, the juiciest and most surprising assertion here is that the M1 SoC will power the incoming MacBook Air. The most recent chatter from the grapevine indicated that the M2 would be the chip of choice for the new Air, but it seems that may not be the case.

Maybe the use of the M1, and lack of any Mini-LED, could point towards Apple looking to keep the price tag of the Air more wallet-friendly, perhaps? Or is this some kind of typo from Kuo, who meant to write M2 but didn’t, maybe? The latter seems unlikely, of course. In fact, the former idea doesn’t seem too convincing either.

What Kuo doesn’t say is what kind of M1 chip might be used. So, it’s possible that a peppier spin, let’s call it the M1X, to pick another name that’s been floating around in the past (and could still theoretically be employed) might be destined to be the engine of the new MacBook Air.

Whatever the case, we’d expect a new MacBook Air launch to come equipped with a meaningfully more powerful CPU, and we can only hope on the pricing front (or that the current model could be maintained as a budget option, if nothing else).

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>Apple Laptop Battery Replacement

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Apple Watch 7 Release Date, Price, Features, Specs and News

After a day using the Samsung Galaxy Z Flip 3, I’m in love. It’s the best clamshell foldable we’ve seen yet, and it’s affordable enough compared to other foldables to actually recommend to consumers.

Not everyone can afford the Z Flip 3’s $999 / £949 / AU$1,499 price tag, and it’s easy to imagine that if consumers are going to pay so much, they might want more functionality from a different (non-folding) phone – for the same price, you can get the Samsung Galaxy S21 Plus’ 30x ‘Space Zoom’ telephoto capability, or the iPhone 12 Pro’s processing power and iOS interface, or the Samsung Galaxy Note 20 Ultra’s stylus functionality.

With updated specs (Snapdragon 888, 8GB RAM, 128GB storage to start) and a 1.9-inch external display, the Z Flip 3 is a better version of the original Samsung Galaxy Z Flip (which had a tiny 1.1-inch outer screen that could show a single line of text). Here’s what it’s like to use.

What’s it like to roll out with a flip?
I was one of the first media to see the original Motorola Razr at an event in November 2019 just before it launched, and I still appreciate its design flourishes, like the satisfying ‘snap’ when folding it close. And the 2.6-inch exterior screen is still the best among clamshell foldables (a category of just the Razr and Z Flip phones at present, to be fair), especially with the exterior screen app functionality that was expanded in the Motorola Razr 2020.

That’s still true. The Z Flip 3’s 1.9-inch outer screen is four times larger than its predecessor’s, but aside from adding more room for notifications, the app functionality is pretty limited to audio controls, weather, and a few other first-party controls – I can’t, for example, reply to a Twitter DM or Slack message. On the other hand, the screen is large enough to preview your selfies, which is great.

One of the first things anyone should do with a Z Flip 3 is something you can only do with a Samsung foldable: unfold the phone 90º and mess around with different apps, which split into top-and-bottom sections thanks to Flex Mode. Deployed this way, the Z Flip 3 looks like a makeup compact, but it’s a great way to take relaxed selfies with friends (no awkward angles required) and listen to media.

Yes, watching media this way on the top half of the 6.7-inch Full HD Plus AMOLED display doesn’t fit how videos are formatted these days (for wide, not square, screens), so the picture is going to be small with big black bars on top and bottom. If you want to watch something, you’re going to have a bad time. But if you want to listen – say, to your favorite YouTuber or Twitch stream – and don’t need constant video, it’s great to just prop the Z Flip 3 up and listen while you fold laundry or play games.

Sure, you can unfold the phone to watch video in a widescreen format, but you either have to prop it up on something like a normal candybar (flat) phone or hold it – and in the latter case, your hand might cover the bottom-firing speaker. There’s a slightly janky workaround: just bend the phone a bit until it stays upright on its side. Even though that leaves the picture a bit bent in turn, it’s at least an option.

The pocketable half-size flagship phone
Being able to fold the Z Flip 3 up and slip it into a pant or bag pocket is great, full stop. While I’d hope the glass back and outer screen doesn’t get scratched up when I throw the phone in with my keys, wallet, and other things, at least I don’t have to worry about the inner display getting damaged.

This makes the Z Flip 3 a great phone to take on a workout. Whether that’s running with the phone (yes, I carry my phone in hand when jogging, and I have no defense) or toting it around the gym, I don’t have to worry as much about it as I do a ‘flat’ phone, which I have to place face-up or face-down with its display exposed.

While I haven’t physically tested the Z Flip 3’s ruggedness (Samsung claims its hinge is 10% more durable than its predecessor), it is nice to know the phone has the same IPX8 water resistance as the Z Fold 3, allowing it to be submerged in hip-deep (1.5 meter) water for half an hour without coming to harm – though I’ll be sure to avoid dropping it in salt water or pool water, as recommended. The phone also isn’t dust-resistant (hence ‘IPX8’ instead of ‘IP68’ rating in other phones), as the hinge is still a vector of entry for physical particles to potentially muck up the foldable.

In other words, my first 24 hours with the Z Flip 3 has been filled with, well, pretty mundane activities: watching media, carrying the phone around, and figuring out how to fit it into my lifestyle. I’ve only taken a few photos, more to try out Flex Mode than measure the Flip 3’s photo capabilities against the other heavy hitters at its price point. I also haven’t tested the battery, which already feels as limited as the battery in its predecessors – it took just under 1.5 hours to charge 80% of the Z Flip 3’s 3,300mAh battery, and that was using a 60W charger.

In any case, there’s a lot left to discover about the Samsung Galaxy Z Flip 3, and we’re eager to give it a full review – but after 24 hours, we’re excited to see what it can teach us about using phones differently.

Buy Samsung Smartphone Battery Online and Enjoy Great Deals & Lowest Price at Batteriestar.com.

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24 Hours with the Samsung Galaxy Z Flip 3

After a day using the Samsung Galaxy Z Flip 3, I’m in love. It’s the best clamshell foldable we’ve seen yet, and it’s affordable enough compared to other foldables to actually recommend to consumers.

Not everyone can afford the Z Flip 3’s $999 / £949 / AU$1,499 price tag, and it’s easy to imagine that if consumers are going to pay so much, they might want more functionality from a different (non-folding) phone – for the same price, you can get the Samsung Galaxy S21 Plus’ 30x ‘Space Zoom’ telephoto capability, or the iPhone 12 Pro’s processing power and iOS interface, or the Samsung Galaxy Note 20 Ultra’s stylus functionality.

With updated specs (Snapdragon 888, 8GB RAM, 128GB storage to start) and a 1.9-inch external display, the Z Flip 3 is a better version of the original Samsung Galaxy Z Flip (which had a tiny 1.1-inch outer screen that could show a single line of text). Here’s what it’s like to use.

What’s it like to roll out with a flip?
I was one of the first media to see the original Motorola Razr at an event in November 2019 just before it launched, and I still appreciate its design flourishes, like the satisfying ‘snap’ when folding it close. And the 2.6-inch exterior screen is still the best among clamshell foldables (a category of just the Razr and Z Flip phones at present, to be fair), especially with the exterior screen app functionality that was expanded in the Motorola Razr 2020.

That’s still true. The Z Flip 3’s 1.9-inch outer screen is four times larger than its predecessor’s, but aside from adding more room for notifications, the app functionality is pretty limited to audio controls, weather, and a few other first-party controls – I can’t, for example, reply to a Twitter DM or Slack message. On the other hand, the screen is large enough to preview your selfies, which is great.

One of the first things anyone should do with a Z Flip 3 is something you can only do with a Samsung foldable: unfold the phone 90º and mess around with different apps, which split into top-and-bottom sections thanks to Flex Mode. Deployed this way, the Z Flip 3 looks like a makeup compact, but it’s a great way to take relaxed selfies with friends (no awkward angles required) and listen to media.

Yes, watching media this way on the top half of the 6.7-inch Full HD Plus AMOLED display doesn’t fit how videos are formatted these days (for wide, not square, screens), so the picture is going to be small with big black bars on top and bottom. If you want to watch something, you’re going to have a bad time. But if you want to listen – say, to your favorite YouTuber or Twitch stream – and don’t need constant video, it’s great to just prop the Z Flip 3 up and listen while you fold laundry or play games.

Sure, you can unfold the phone to watch video in a widescreen format, but you either have to prop it up on something like a normal candybar (flat) phone or hold it – and in the latter case, your hand might cover the bottom-firing speaker. There’s a slightly janky workaround: just bend the phone a bit until it stays upright on its side. Even though that leaves the picture a bit bent in turn, it’s at least an option.

The pocketable half-size flagship phone
Being able to fold the Z Flip 3 up and slip it into a pant or bag pocket is great, full stop. While I’d hope the glass back and outer screen doesn’t get scratched up when I throw the phone in with my keys, wallet, and other things, at least I don’t have to worry about the inner display getting damaged.

This makes the Z Flip 3 a great phone to take on a workout. Whether that’s running with the phone (yes, I carry my phone in hand when jogging, and I have no defense) or toting it around the gym, I don’t have to worry as much about it as I do a ‘flat’ phone, which I have to place face-up or face-down with its display exposed.

While I haven’t physically tested the Z Flip 3’s ruggedness (Samsung claims its hinge is 10% more durable than its predecessor), it is nice to know the phone has the same IPX8 water resistance as the Z Fold 3, allowing it to be submerged in hip-deep (1.5 meter) water for half an hour without coming to harm – though I’ll be sure to avoid dropping it in salt water or pool water, as recommended. The phone also isn’t dust-resistant (hence ‘IPX8’ instead of ‘IP68’ rating in other phones), as the hinge is still a vector of entry for physical particles to potentially muck up the foldable.

In other words, my first 24 hours with the Z Flip 3 has been filled with, well, pretty mundane activities: watching media, carrying the phone around, and figuring out how to fit it into my lifestyle. I’ve only taken a few photos, more to try out Flex Mode than measure the Flip 3’s photo capabilities against the other heavy hitters at its price point. I also haven’t tested the battery, which already feels as limited as the battery in its predecessors – it took just under 1.5 hours to charge 80% of the Z Flip 3’s 3,300mAh battery, and that was using a 60W charger.

In any case, there’s a lot left to discover about the Samsung Galaxy Z Flip 3, and we’re eager to give it a full review – but after 24 hours, we’re excited to see what it can teach us about using phones differently.

Buy Samsung Smartphone Battery Online and Enjoy Great Deals & Lowest Price at Batteriestar.com.

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Xbox Series X vs Xbox Series S: which Xbox is right for you?

Overall, in the Xbox Series X vs Xbox Series S battle, you’re going to find that the winner is entirely dependent on what you’re looking for from your console. Both consoles have their merits but in the end it’ll likely come down to your budget, how much you need a disc-drive and how high native 4K output is on your priorities list.

We’ve reviewed both the Xbox Series X and Xbox Series S, so we’re more than familiar with the strengths and weaknesses of both consoles. The Xbox Series X is undoubtedly the powerhouse, top-of-the-line option but the Xbox Series S has its much lower price on its side.

Xbox Series X vs Xbox Series S: key differences
If you only walk away with three key differences in mind, let it be these: the Xbox Series X has a 4K UHD Blu-ray drive that’s capable of playing physical games and movies while the Xbox Series S does not; the Xbox Series X has a large 1TB SSD that can store, on average, around 16 games while the Xbox Series S has a 512GB SSD that only stores around four to five; and the Xbox Series X renders games in native 4K at 60 frames-per-second, while the Xbox Series S targets 1440p.

Otherwise, both will have the same user interface, the same controller and the same Xbox Velocity Architecture that enables features like Quick Resume. Both have the same media apps like Netflix, Amazon Prime Video, Hulu and more, and more importantly, both can play exactly the same games.

More people seem drawn to the power of the Xbox Series X from what we’ve seen so far, but that’s not to discount the advantages of the more affordable model. Both work well and both can serve a different audience.

First up is the Xbox Series X, Microsoft’s flagship console that’s capable of 4K graphics and is currently one of the most powerful consoles ever made. On paper the specs are very impressive, and it has a compact tower-style design that manages to be both unique and unobtrusive . It costs a pretty penny, though, at $499 / £449 / AU$749, the same price as the PS5.

The Xbox Series S is far more affordable, however, albeit a less powerful alternative for consumers to consider. It’s digital-only, so you’ll be at the mercy of the Microsoft Store for any purchases you make. That said, Xbox Game Pass, Microsoft’s Netflix-like subscription service and Project xCloud, that lets gamers stream games from the cloud, do alleviate the digital-only restrictions somewhat. Overall, the Series S’ price point is aimed at those who are willing to compromise on power for a much better price.

The Xbox Series X costs $499 / £449 / AU$749 and launched on November 10, 2020. The console is packed with cutting-edge technology, and goes head-to-head with the PS5, which also costs $499. The price point may be too expensive for some, but it puts the Xbox Series X in a strong position to compete with Sony’s hardware.

The Xbox Series S launched alongside the Series X and its price is much lower at just $299.99 / £249.99 / AU$499. A $200 saving will be very appealing to the more cost-conscious consumer.

Xbox Series X vs Xbox Series S specs
The Xbox Series X is a beast of a console that’s truly brought us into the latest generation of gaming. Here’s what’s inside the diminutive tower of power:

CPU: Eight-core 3.8GHz (3.6GHz with SMT) custom AMD 7nm
GPU: 12 teraflops 1.825GHz (locked)
RAM: 16GB GDDR6
Frame rate: Up to 120 fps
Resolution: Up to 8K
Optical: HD Blu-Ray disk drive
Storage: 1TB NVMe SSD

With a 12 teraflop GPU capable of up to 120 frames per second, the Xbox Series X is twice as powerful as the Xbox One X, Microsoft’s former flagship console. It supports various exciting next-gen features such as ray tracing, variable rate shading and even support for 8K resolution.

The Xbox Series X makes the wait when booting up games or loading new levels a thing of the past thanks to its custom designed super-fast NVMe SSD. The SSD is part of the console’s new Velocity Architecture, which allows multiple games to be suspended in the background while you’re playing something entirely different. Everything is more responsive and snappier as a result, too.

Microsoft is also trying to make latency a thing of the past on Xbox Series X. Forward-thinking features such as Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM), communication improvements to the Xbox controller, and Variable Refresh Rate (VRR) support take full advantage of TVs with HDMI 2.1 support.

In comparison, here are the Xbox Series S specs:
CPU: Eight-core 3.6GHz (3.4GHz with SMT) custom AMD 7nm
GPU: 4 teraflops at 1.550GHz
RAM: 10GB GDDR6
Frame rate: Up to 120 fps
Resolution: 1440p with 4K upscaling
Optical: No disk drive
Storage: 512GB NVMe SSD

The Xbox Series S packs a lot of power for such a small box. The console targets a resolution of 1440p instead of native 4K (some games do support native 4K, though), and is capable of 120fps gaming. It has an almost identical CPU to the Xbox Series X, but the GPU is considerably less powerful, and it comes with 10GB of GDDR6 RAM instead of 16GB.

That might sound like a big compromise on paper, but remember the Xbox Series S is targeting 1440p/60fps instead of 4K/60fps. This means it needs less power to reach its pixel count, but it can still deliver all the next-gen features Microsoft is focusing on like ray tracing and 120fps.

There’s no disk drive, of course, and the storage is almost halved compared to the Xbox Series X. That’s admittedly concerning for a digital-only model, but Microsoft is undoubtedly hoping people are taking advantage of Project xCloud which involves no downloads at all as game’s are streamed from Microsoft’s remote data servers.

The storage of both consoles can be expanded, however. Microsoft is selling a 1TB proprietary expansion card that plugs into the back of the console. Xbox One games can also be stored on a standard external hard drive to help free up space.

The Xbox Series S and Xbox Series X also support Spatial Sound, including Dolby Atmos, and Dolby Vision via streaming apps at launch. Dolby Vision support for gaming was introduced post-launch but is now available.

Xbox Series X vs Xbox Series S games
So here’s what you need to know: both the Xbox Series X and Xbox Series S are able to play exactly the same games, although they’ll undoubtedly look best on Xbox Series X.

The kind of compromises we expect to see on Xbox Series S will focus on the drop to 1440p resolution from 4K, and maybe some more minor changes that probably won’t be as noticeable.

Both consoles offer full backwards-compatibility with Xbox One, Xbox 360 and original Xbox games. So while we’re still waiting for some of the biggest next-gen exclusives like Fable 4 and Halo Infinite to launch, there’s still plenty to play, particularly if you have a large library of titles already. If you own a lot of physical copies, though, be mindful that these won’t work on Xbox Series S due to the lack of disc drive.

Xbox Series X vs Xbox Series S verdict
Microsoft may be onto something here. By offering two consoles that target different audiences, consumers ultimately have more choice and more ways to enter into the Xbox ecosystem. If only the best will do, pick up an Xbox Series X, but be prepared to pay a premium. Want to enter the next generation without breaking the bank? The Xbox Series S is a fantastic entry point, and one with a seriously tempting price.

Microsoft seems to have created two appealing iterations of its console, without one appearing less attractive than the other. Crucially, it will now be able to fight the PS5 on two fronts: price and performance. The Xbox Series S costs significantly less than the PS5.

By creating an argument for Xbox Series X vs Xbox Series S, Microsoft has essentially done its best to turn consumers’ heads where it might not have done so were it a straight fight between Xbox Series X and PS5. And that’s surely a win for Xbox as a whole.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>Microsoft Xbox Adapter
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>Sony PlayStation Battery Replacement

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Microsoft’s Surface Go 3 Is an Affordable Windows 11 iPad Rival

Microsoft’s lightest and most portable Surface is officially here.

The Surface Go 3 is an affordable Windows 11 tablet akin in size and price to a mid-range Android tablet or education-first Chromebook. It weighs in at 1.2 pounds and starts at $400 (similar to the last-generation Surface Go 2).

The Surface Go 3 sports a dual-core Intel Pentium Gold 6500Y processor and 4GB of RAM, though there’s an option to upgrade to a quad-core 10th-generation Intel Core i3-10100Y processor with 8GB of RAM (though that model competes with more capable devices like the Samsung Galaxy Chromebook 2). Still, the Surface Go 3 is actually smaller than other Chromebooks that feature the same Core i3 chip.

The main appeal of the Surface Go 3 is that it has all the convertible magic of the other Surface devices. The 10.5-inch display is a touchscreen with an adjustable kickstand that’s compatible with the Surface Pen, so you can draw, write, and sketch as you need with compatible Windows apps. You will need the TypeCover (which is sold separately) to type, however.

The Surface Go 3 also packs in a 5-megapixel front-facing camera for video calls and an 8-MP rear-facing camera. Photographers can easily pop in an SD card via the integrated MicroSDXC card reader, and there’s a Surface Connect port for compatible adapters. If you opt for the LTE version, the Surface Go 3 will also have a nano-SIM tray.

As we noted in our review of the Surface Go 2, the Go line’s size makes it an excellent second-tier device for use on the go or somewhere else in the house. The Surface Go 3 might have a better chance of replacing your laptop simply because it’ll run Windows 11, which is more streamlined for convertible devices. Microsoft also promises an all-day battery on the Surface Go 3, another pain point of its predecessor.

The wifi-only version of the Surface Go 3 is available for preorder now in select markets. The LTE version will be available in the coming months.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>Microsoft Laptop Battery Replacement

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Here’s How Long You’ll Have To Wait For Each iPhone 13 Model to Ship

iPhone 13 preorders kicked off for more than a week ago, and if you didn’t get your order in early, good luck. Overwhelming demand for the latest iPhones has caused Apple’s estimated shipping times to creep up as the days have gone by. While ship dates were expected to start in mid-September for some of the devices early on, they now stretch all the way to November for some models—meaning you’d better hurry up and order now if you want to see your new phone before the holidays.

For now at least, the speediest option appears to be the iPhone 13 Mini, which is scheduled to ship out on Oct. 13 at the earliest. But if it’s the iPhone 13 Pro or the iPhone 13 Pro Max you’re after, your luck will be tougher: Those devices have estimated ship dates as late as Nov. 2.

If you’re stressed about when the iPhone 13, iPhone 13 Mini, iPhone 13 Pro, or iPhone 13 Pro Max will be arriving at your doorstep, fear not—we’ve assembled a handy guide for each model, color and configuration combo below. Be warned, however, that while these estimates were all pulled from Apple’s website, your location could affect the expected shipping time. These dates are subject to change—and have been changing, quite frequently.

While the phones are, for the most part, available for in-store pick up, getting them in person could prove to be nasty business, if the photos of round-the-block lines and reports of immediate sell-outs on Friday were any indication.

When Does the iPhone 13 Mini Ship?
Pink:
128GB: Oct. 13-15
256GB: Oct. 13-15
512GB: Oct. 13-15

Blue:
128GB: Oct. 13-15
256GB: Oct. 13-15
512GB: Oct. 13-15

Midnight:
128GB: Oct. 13-15
256GB: Oct. 13-15
512GB: Oct. 13-15

Starlight
128GB: Oct. 13-15
256GB: Oct. 13-15
512GB: Oct. 13-15

Red
128GB: Oct. 13-15
256GB: Oct. 13-15
512GB: Oct. 13-15

When Does the iPhone 13 Ship?
Pink:
128GB: Oct. 14-19
256GB: Oct. 14-19
512GB: Oct. 14-19

Blue:
128GB: Oct. 14-19
256GB: Oct. 14-19
512GB: Oct. 14-19

Midnight:
128GB: Oct. 14-19
256GB: Oct. 14-19
512GB: Oct. 14-19

Starlight
128GB: Oct. 14-19
256GB: Oct. 14-19
512GB: Oct. 14-19

Red
128GB: Oct. 14-19
256GB: Oct. 14-19
512GB: Oct. 14-19

When Does the iPhone 13 Pro Ship?
Silver
128GB: Oct. 26-Nov. 2
256GB: Oct. 26-Nov. 2
512GB: Oct. 26-Nov. 2
1TB: Oct. 26-Nov. 2

Graphite
128GB: Oct. 26-Nov. 2
256GB: Oct. 26-Nov. 2
512GB: Oct. 26-Nov. 2
1TB: Oct. 26-Nov. 2

Gold
128GB: Oct. 26-Nov. 2
256GB: Oct. 26-Nov. 2
512GB: Oct. 26-Nov. 2
1TB: Oct. 26-Nov. 2

Sierra Blue
128GB: Oct. 26-Nov. 2
256GB: Oct. 26-Nov. 2
512GB: Oct. 26-Nov. 2
1TB: Oct. 26-Nov. 2

When Does the iPhone 13 Pro Max Ship?
Silver
128GB: Oct. 26-Nov. 2
256GB: Oct. 26-Nov. 2
512GB: Oct. 26-Nov. 2
1TB : Oct. 26-Nov. 2

Graphite
128GB: Oct. 26-Nov. 2
256GB: Oct. 26-Nov. 2
512GB: Oct. 26-Nov. 2
1TB: Oct. 26-Nov. 2

Gold
128GB: Oct. 26-Nov. 2
256GB: Oct. 26-Nov. 2
512GB: Oct. 26-Nov. 2
1TB: Oct. 26-Nov. 2

Sierra Blue
128GB: Oct. 26-Nov. 2
256GB: Oct. 26-Nov. 2
512GB: Oct. 26-Nov. 2
1TB: Oct. 26-Nov. 2

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>Apple iPhone Battery Replacement

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Microsoft Foldable Surface Duo 2 Looks to Fix All the Originals Mistakes

Microsoft’s Surface Duo, released last year, was a bold move. The dual-screen folding phone was interesting, but that didn’t make it good. With the new Surface Duo 2, Microsoft is doubling down with better specs that aim to improve all the issues we had with the original.

The Surface Duo’s design was imperfect, but there was something elegant about its two ultra-thin screens separated by an innovative hinge with excellent balance. But it seems the original Surface Duo took so long to develop that by the time it came out, its specs and cameras were already outdated at launch.

With the Surface Duo 2, Microsoft has finally added the kind of flagship specs (mostly) that its dual-screen phone needs to make good on its vision—and to make that $1,500 price tag worth it. There’s a Qualcomm Snapdragon 888 chip (up from the SD855 on last year’s model), 8GB of RAM (up from 6GB), and storage options that go from 128GB up to 512GB.

Microsoft also added NFC—which should really be a standard feature on all phones nowadays—along with support for 5G connectivity. The Surface Duo 2 measures just 0.21 inches thick when fully opened, and Microsoft claims it’s the thinnest 5G mobile device on the market.

The Duo 2 also gets a huge camera upgrade. Microsoft added a new 12-MP selfie camera on the inside along with a huge new triple-lens rear camera module in back with 12-MP main cam, a 16-MP ultra-wide cam, and a 12-MP telephoto cam with a 2x optical zoom. This gives the Duo 2 much more respectable photo chops compared to competing flagship handsets, though the size of the rear camera module does come with the downside of not being able to fully open the Duo 2 a full 360 degrees as you might on a 2-in-1 device.

The Duo 2 just feels like a more polished device. Microsoft has smoothed out some of the original’s sharp edges, which makes the Duo 2 a lot nicer to hold and open and close on a regular basis. The phone’s fingerprint sensor has also been baked into its lock button. And even though the Duo 2 is about the same overall size as its predecessor, Microsoft slimmed down its bezels and added slightly larger 5.8-inch 1344 x 1892 AMOLED touchscreens with 90Hz refresh rates on either side, so there’s even more screen real estate to enjoy.

Microsoft added a couple of small but clever touches, like a case with a magnet for attaching the new Surface Pen 2, and a new peek feature that allows you to check the time or see notifications by looking at the gap where the Duo 2’s screens meet its hinge. Microsoft could have easily skipped the peek feature, because other foldables don’t include something like this, but it makes it so much easier to keep tabs on events without fully opening the Duo 2. It might be my favorite upgrade on the entire device.

There are a few things still missing on the Duo 2 that I wish Microsoft had included, like support for wireless charging and some kind of official rating for dust and water resistance.

But more importantly, even with all the Surface Duo 2’s upgraded hardware, the success of Microsoft’s latest dual-screen phone will still ultimately hinge on its software. The Duo 2 is launching with Android 11 pre-installed, which is a good start, but because the devices I tested out were still running pre-release beta software, it remains to be seen how well Microsoft has been able to iron out some of the bugs people encountered on the original. Those ranged from general sluggishness and occasional difficulty dragging apps and files from one screen to another, to ghosting that caused elements of some apps to remain on the screen even when the app was closed.

Companies like Samsung could learn a lot from some of the gestures and functions Microsoft has created to move and manipulate apps across the Duo’s screens. But the Duo 2 is Microsoft’s second attempt to make dual-screen devices a thing, and people are going to be extra critical (rightly so) if there are still a lot of kinks or bugs in the Duo 2’s software. But it seems the Duo 2 has the specs it needs to properly compete with phones like the Galaxy Z Fold 3, and after a year of development, hopefully the Duo’s software has taken a huge step forward, too.

The Surface Duo 2 is available for preorder starting today for $1,500, and starts shipping Oct. 21.

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LG Shows Off Foldable Plastic Display That Promises to Be As Hard As Glass

LG is done making smartphones, though that doesn’t mean it isn’t still attempting to one-up its biggest rival. Samsung beat the competition to the punch with foldable phones, but its bendable screens came with a preinstalled layer of protective film to keep the display from falling apart. LG’s solution to this promises to be more sophisticated, with improved plastic that the company is calling “Real Folding Window.”

There aren’t many specifics on the new material used. LG Chem, which published the press release, mentions that it uses a Polyester (PET) film material to coat each glass side. According to a spokesperson for LG Chem, the coating is enough reinforcement to “maximize flexibility.” LG adds that it’s thinner “compared to existing tempered glass,” and while it has the same hardness, it’s not as prone to “cracking on the screen.”

The Real Folding Window is coated in “a few dozen micrometers” of this new material to increase its resistance to heat. The company is also working on developing a version of the Real Folding Window without additional reinforcement.

The Real Folding Window has an advantage over its competition: It can bend both outward and inward. It’s unclear if the display can bend both ways on the same device or if this is mere mention to show LG’s plan for manufacturing scalability. The company says the coated glass will work with tablets, laptops, and bendable phones.

LG plans to start production on the foldable display technology next year, with plans to “begin full-scale sales” in 2023. The company hopes to start with mobile phones and plans to expand to laptops and tablets eventually.

Of course, LG is not without competition from Samsung in this realm. Samsung showed off its upcoming foldable display tech earlier this year at the SID’s annual Display Week. Samsung is also tipped to be working with Google on a folding Pixel smartphone and with Corning on a more durable glass. It’ll be interesting to see which manufacturers LG partners with when its bendable Real Folding Window hits the market.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>LG Laptop Battery Replacement

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Lenovo’s Fall Lineup Includes Ryzen Windows 11 Laptops

Lenovo has an absolute ton of devices coming this fall, and of particular note are the company’s new Windows laptops and Chromebooks. The company just took the wraps off its first AMD Ryzen-based IdeaPad Slim 7 Carbon, along with an update to the Chromebook Duet, which was one of the more popular Chrome OS devices to sell out at the start of the pandemic. And for those wondering who is still selling Android tablets, Lenovo has a new one that promises enticing specs—perhaps powerful enough to woo you away from Apple’s iPad.

Ryzen IdeaPads
Let’s just jump right in. The IdeaPad Slim 7 Carbon is 14.9mm thin and weighs less than three pounds. It has a 14-inch quad-HD display with a 90Hz refresh rate and a maximum brightness of 400 nits. The IdeaPad Slim 7 Carbon includes a 61Wh battery, and there are vents on the side to help dissipate heat when the laptop is resting on a table.

Inside, the IdeaPad Slim 7 Carbon is available with an AMD Ryzen 7 5800U mobile processor and up to 16GB of RAM. The Carbon variants of Lenovo’s laptops are typically more durable and lightweight due to their aluminum build, and when I saw the laptop in person, it was indeed quite light—I didn’t feel much strain holding it with one hand. The IdeaPad Slim 7 Carbon starts at $1,290 and will be on sale in October. It will ship with Windows 11 right out of the box.

The IdeaPad Slim 7 Pro is the other Ryzen-based Windows laptop announced alongside the Carbon. It’s tuned for content creators and pros, and as a result, offers a larger 16-inch display with a 120Hz refresh rate. Inside, it’s available with up to the same AMD Ryzen 7 5800U mobile processor as the Carbon, as well as up to 16GB of RAM. It has a larger 75Wh battery to accommodate the higher refresh rate and will ship with Windows 11 out of the box. The IdeaPad Slim 7 Pro starts at $1,450 and will also be available in October 2021.

Chromebook Duet 5
Lenovo is refreshing the Chromebook Duet with upgraded specs and a more refined look. The Duet 5 Chromebook runs on Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 7c Gen 2 processor with up to 8GB of RAM. This Chromebook is best suited for school-from-home, or perhaps even WFH, depending on how much power you need.

The Duet 5 Chromebook resembles a traditional laptop, with a 13.3-inch full-HD OLED display, though you can convert it to a tablet as you need. There’s a comfortable keyboard included. It’s available with up to 256GB of storage, which should be enough if you’re truly planning to take advantage of Chrome’s cloud storage. There’s also a 42Wh battery on the inside with rapid-charging technology and both a front-facing 5-MP camera and a rear-facing 8-MP camera for video chatting. There are a limited number of ports, however, with only two USB-C slots available. You’ll want to invest in an adapter to add peripherals or connect the Chromebook to a monitor.

The Lenovo Chromebook Duet 5 starts at $430 and will be available in October.

Tab P12 Pro
For those asking about the manufacturers still producing Android tablets, look no further than Lenovo. Lenovo announced the Tab P12 Pro, a successor to the P11 Pro, though it’s not necessarily a replacement.

This tablet is a whopper of a device. It has a 12.6-inch display with a 120Hz refresh rate and up to 600 nits of brightness. It’s powered by a Qualcomm Snapdragon 870 processor and is available with up to 8GB of RAM and up to 256GB of storage.

The tablet has both facial recognition and a fingerprint reader embedded into the power button. There’s a front-facing 8-MP and dual rear-facing cameras, including a 5-MP wide-angle camera and a 13-MP autofocus camera. The Tab P12 Pro also features quad JBL speakers and Dolby Atmos to make it more of a home entertainment device.

For stylus users, the Tab P12 Pro comes with the Lenovo Precision Pen 3, and there’s an optional keyboard available. There’s even a handy silicone case on the back of the folio cover to bring the pen along without worrying about losing it.

The Tab P12 Pro will cost $610 and will be available in October. It will launch with Android 11 out of the box.

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